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Wednesday, March 30, 2011

ART. MODERN AMERICAN PAINTING /English Club “Discovery”/

 /based on: EnglishClub.com/
woavinnitsa.blogspot.com
Warming Up
The artist is not a special kind of a man, but every man is a special kind of an artist (Ananda Coomaraswamy, 1877-1947). Does it mean that everybody might be an artist?
Brainstorming
Pair Work: Activity 1
How much do you know about art? Find out in the ‘true/false’ quiz below.
Van Gogh’s first name was Victor. T/F
The statue called the Venus de Milo is in Louvre in Paris. T/F
Pablo Picasso was a French artist. T/F
The Ufizzi Gallery is in Rome, Italy. T/F
Michelangelo was a sculptor as well as a painter. T/F
Salvador Dali was a Surrealist painter. T/F
Italian painter Leonardo da Vinci died in France. T/F
American painter Jackson Pollock was an Abstract artist. T/F
Ashcan is an art style known in Ukraine. T/F

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Motivation (based on "Dead Poets Society" by Robin Williams)

Warming Up
Colour Idioms
Idiom                            Meaning                                                 Example Sentence
beet red  dark red (usually to describe face) My sister's face turned beet red when I caught her singing in front of a mirror.
black and white straight forward, very clear The rules we gave the kids were black and white. No answering the phone or the door.
black sheep the odd or bad member of the group My oldest brother was the black sheep in our family. He dropped out of school at fifteen.
catch red handed catch someone in the act of doing something wrong or illegal The kids were caught red handed stealing chocolate bars.
golden opportunity the perfect chance The models' conference was a golden opportunityfor me to sell my beauty products.
grass is always greener on the other side you always want what you don't have
I always wanted to go to university, but now I wish I had time to get a job. Grass is always greener on the other side.
the green light permission The builders were given the green light to begin the tower.
(have a) green thumb be skillful in the garden You can tell by her flower garden that Sheila has agreen thumb.
have the blues be sad or depressed I always have the the blues during the winter time.
in the red in debt When we were in the red we almost had to sell the house.
once in a blue moon very rarely We only go out for dinner once in a blue moon.
rose coloured glasses unrealistic view Paula imagines Hollywood with rose coloured glasses.

Monday, March 28, 2011

E-library

On March, 28 2011 Vinnytsia Information Center “Window on America” gave a new presentation on Virtual Library Databases. There were librarians from Vinnytsia region libraries, research workers and some students  from University of Agriculture (23 participants). They were acquainted with E-Library having an opportunity to use this database.

EBSCO articles were used to make research in various spheres of agriculture. The users learnt to load articles and to translate them.

Thursday, March 24, 2011

PROJECTS AT OUR CENTER...

On March, 23 two main projects “Management, Marketing & Tourism” and “25 Books That Changed America” started at Vinnytsia Information Center “Window on America”. The users were proposed to take a set of seminars on International Management, Marketing & Tourism”. The leader is Jim Buell (a PC  volunteer), an instructor in it. The result of it is writing a project by all the participants.
There were 18 participants willing to take a part in seminars and make their direct hand in drafting a project on presented topics. They are students of Vinnytsia University of Trade and Economics, their associate instructors, financial workers, and those who have their own business.  It was an introduction where everybody had a chance to discuss related topics and arrange that topics which would be in a focus. As a result, the following topics will be discussed: SWOT ANALYSIS, Current Situation, Mission Statements, Introduction to Marketing, Pricing, Placement, Promotion and Positioning, Project Management.
The project “25 Books that Changed America” was opened on March, 23 (based on a book by Robert B. Downs, 25 Major Milestones in the History of American Ideas). March, 23 is a special day in the American History. It is a turning point giving impulses to the American Revolution.  That's why a discussion of Thomas Paine's Common Sense was chosen as the 1st Book that changed America. It was a presentation about Thomas Paine, his contributions with his toward the beginning of the United States as a nation. The participants (university students, financial workers, school teachers, and scholl students) (10 participants) were ready to discuss some questions realted to the American History.  Some expressions and quotations were said about the Founder of American Independence: “Thomas Paine needs no monument made by hands; he has erected a monument in the hearts of all lovers of liberty” (- Andrew Jackson).

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Today in the American History - March 23

Events:
1765 - The Stamp Act came into force in Colonial America.
1775 - Patrick Henry gave his famous "Give me liberty or give me death" speech before the American Revolution.
Overview of Colonial America 1607 - 1754
From the foundation of the colonies beginning with the founding of Jamestown until the beginning of the Revolutionary War, different regions of the eastern coast had different characteristics. Once established, the thirteen British colonies could be divided into three geographic areas: New England, Middle, and Southern. Each of these had specific economic, social, and political developments that were unique to the regions.

YOU ARE INVITED!

YOU ARE INVITED!

Information Center "Window on America" proposes you to take a set of seminars on International Management, Marketing and Tourism. The leader is Jim Buell (a PC volunteer). The result of it is writing a project by all participants.
When: Every Wednesday (starting - March, 23), @ 15.30.
Where: Information Center WOA, (the Department of Foreign Languages)

Saturday, March 19, 2011

THE INTERNATIONAL WRITING OLYMPICS has come to Ukraine!

This creative writing contest, coordinated by Peace Corps Volunteers in several countries, is a great way to encourage pupils [forms 6-11] and university students [years 1-4] to use English in a fun and interesting way. Writing will be judged on creativity of ideas more than perfection of mechanics.
Across Ukraine, IWO essays are already written!  Next, here are the most important dates to remember.
March 4– school winners chosen and announced locally
March 11– school winners submitted to oblast coordinators for judging
March 18– oblast winners chosen, announced by oblast coordinators, submitted to national judges
April 1– national winners chosen, notified by email, results posted on this website
*April 8– national winners submitted for international judging
*April 18– international winners announced

Congratulations to Vinnytska Oblast International Writing Olympics winner Vita Zelenska, of Vinnitsya State Pedagogical University! Vita's essay was chosen to continue on to national competition, and we wish her the best!

GREEN TOURISM


Reaction to Famous Quote
Always forgive your enemies. Nothing annoys them so much.
- Oscar Wilde
Is it easy to forgive someone who has done something wrong to you? Are you able to forgive people? When you do something wrong, is it important to get forgiveness from the other person?

Discussion Topic: The Great Outdoors (Green Tourism)
1.Do you enjoying camping? Are you comfortable sleeping in a tent, or do you need to stay in a hotel?
2.Are you afraid of any wild animals or insects? Which ones would you be most afraid to meet in nature?
3.What do you know about Green Tourism? Would you like to go on such a vacation?
4.Do you think it would be possible for Ukraine to develop a successful tourism business based around its nature? Would foreigners travel to Ukraine because of its natural beauty?

Group Task – 5 Questions
Writing Task
Our Schedule

Saturday, March 19 – 1400 Rehabilitation Center
March 20 – March 30  No English Club
Thursday, March 31 – 1730 Library
Saturday, April 2 – 1030 Library

Join Our Group on www.Facebook.com – English Club in Vinnytsia
English Club Blog - www.woavinnitsa.blogspot.com

Friday, March 18, 2011

Календар подій, які відбуватимуться в офісі Програми ім. Фулбрайта

Календар подій, які відбуватимуться в офісі Програми ім. Фулбрайта цієї весни, та графік презентацій Програми ім. Фулбрайта в різних містах України до кінця травня.
The Virtual Fulbright Ukraine
Check out the internet www.fulbright.org.ua and Fulbright Ukraine page on Facebook to find out information on the following events:
 • Workshops/Online webinars: This will give you information on essay-writing workshops and webinars for applicants to the Fulbright Programs
 • Fulbright-Ukraine outreach schedule: If you are in one of the cities in which we will be doing presentations on Fulbright, we invite you to join us in discussing with Ukrainian Fulbright Alumni and U.S. Fulbrighters in Ukraine what the Fulbright experience is, and what the benefits are for all involved
 • Fulbright Art Gallery: “From Spring to Spring” Paintings by Maryna Onyshchenko-Mandrykova,
March 4 –April 4, Kyiv

Fulbright Calendar_ Spring Semester 2011
Fulbright Application Workshops/Webinars in Spring Semester
Attend the Fulbright Application Workshops during the Spring Semester. These workshops help applicants prepare and refine their Fulbright applications and essays. While they are NOT mandatory they are HIGHLY recommended. ALL of last year’s successful candidates were in attendance at these workshops.

The workshops will take place at 16:30 in the Office of the Fulbright Program in Ukraine, vul. Hrushevskoho, 4, Suite 305, Kyiv. As space in the Office of the Fulbright Program in Ukraine is limited to 25 participants, you must call (044-279-1850; 044-279-2324) or email the office:  (secretary@fulbright.com.ua) and sign-up for a specific date no less than three (3) days prior to the workshop.

Thursday, March 17, 2011

A little bit Irish on St. Patrick’s Day ...

March 17 is the feast day of Ireland’s patron saint, the cleric Patrick (386–461).
St. Patrick’s Day might be one of the world’s most celebrated holidays, with city-sponsored festivities held in Japan, Australia, Canada, Malaysia, Great Britain and the United States as well as the saint’s beloved Ireland. But perhaps in no other adopted nation is the Irish presence felt as keenly as in the United States, where an ethnic holiday has expanded to embrace all Americans.
In virtually every U.S. elementary school, public or private, classrooms are decorated with green; a failure to wear green to school on St. Patrick’s Day might be punished with a playful pinch. Stationery stores sell St. Patrick’s Day greeting cards, bakeries offer shamrock-shaped cookies sprinkled with green sugar, and local pubs serve green beer.
Read More: http://www.america.gov/st/peopleplace-english/2008/March/20060308150433abretnuh2.862811e-04.html

English Speaking Club
Introductions
- Today is St. Patrick's Day ... what do you know about this hoilday? How is it celebrated in the world?
- For you, what is the best part of American culture, and what is the worst part?

Discussion topic: POLITENESS

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Virtual Library: New Users

On March 16, 2011 Vinnytsia Information Center “Window on America” made a presentation “Virtual Library Database: E-books and E-magazines” for librarians of Vinnytsia Region Libraries (Tulchyn). The participants were engaged into searching e-books and e-journals using various key-words. Ebrary, Gale and Library, Information Science & Technology were among first-rate used. Some of the users were interested in Encyclopedia Britannica and Oxford Analytica.
The librarians were eager to have this database access at their local libraries to use e-books in their practice. They got the skills in usage of Virtual Library making a translation of the searched articles.
The participants were also interested in world electronic libraries with open access to them.

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

"ROSETTA STONE" у нашому Центрі

Вивчаймо англійську разом з
"ROSETTA STONE"
("РОЗЕТСЬКЕ КАМІННЯ")

Дана технологія дає можливість навчатись так, як Ви дитиною брались вчити свою рідну мову – без правил, шляхом занурення у мовну атмосферу, багаторазового повторення і вироблення асоціативного ряду у різноманітних сферах життя, формування шаблонів і автоматизмів за принципом від абеткового до складного, від практичного сприймання до написання і правил.

Rosetta Stone — No.1 у світі серед лінгвістичного програмового забезпечення. Rosetta Stone найбільш "рідний", а тому і найефективніший для людини спосіб вивчення практично будь-якої іноземної мови (31). Компанією використовується спеціально розроблена технологія Dynamic Immersion — «динамічне занурення».
http://www.rosettastone.com/
http://blog.rosettastone.com/
http://twitter.com/rosettastone
http://www.facebook.com/RosettaStoneCareers

“Rosetta Stone teaches us to learn languages like we did when we were kids. 
It was easier back then. Use Rosetta Stone to make it easier right now”. — Eddie Izzard, comedian and actor

Spring is in the air, and so are the buzzards!

Buzzard Day In America
(March, 16)
See buzzards (turkey vultures) come home to roost in the rock cliffs and ledges in Hinckley. This annual celebration dates back to 1957 when 9,000 visitors flocked the township to see the return of the buzzards from their winter hiatus. The event includes an early bird hike; skits, songs and stories performed in tents or in fields, displays, crafts, photos, contests and additional hikes.

TODAY IN THE AMERICAN HISTORY

Today in History: March 15
On March 15, 1820, Maine became the twenty-third state in the Union. Originally a province of Massachusetts, Maine is noted for its picturesque coastline and dense woodlands. Even today, ninety percent of Maine remains forested.
Explorer Samuel de Champlain reached the coast of Maine in 1604 and claimed it as part of the French province of Acadia. France and Britain disputed ownership until 1763, when the region was ceded to the British during negotiations ending the French and Indian War.

Read More: http://international.loc.gov/ammem/today/

On this day in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson addressed a joint session of Congress to urge the passage of legislation guaranteeing voting rights for all.

Using the phrase "we shall overcome," borrowed from African-American leaders struggling for equal rights, Johnson declared that "every American citizen must have an equal right to vote." Johnson reminded the nation that the Fifteenth Amendment, which was passed after the Civil War, gave all citizens the right to vote regardless of race or color. But states had defied the Constitution and erected barriers. Discrimination had taken the form of literacy, knowledge or character tests administered solely to African-Americans to keep them from registering to vote.
Read More: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

Read More About Maine in the Following Books:
A Guide to Popular U.S. Landmarks as Listed in the National Register of Historic Places / Richard Guy Wilson, general editor.
Great landmarks can be found all over the United States. Whether you are in Brunswick, Maine, visiting the Harriet Beecher Stowe House, walking through a frontier town in the Tombstone Historic District in Tombstone, Arizona, or taking a tour of the White House in Washington, D.C., each state has unique places to visit, places that are part of its history and heritage. This single volume reference book discusses these and many other popular landmarks in the United States. Organized by state, with special features that include a bibliography, an index, and sidebars, A Guide to Popular U.S. Landmarks is a terrific resource for young readers.
 About Maine - P. 44
United States of America (by Christine Petersen, David Petersen)
United States of America
About This Book
Animals. American History. Earth Science. Geography. Health. Space. True Books covers all this and more in photo-filled chapter books that provide a basic introduction to curriculum-relevant topics. Ideal for today's young investigative reader, each True Book includes lively sidebars, a glossary and an index, plus a comprehensive "To Find Out More" section listing books, organizations, and Internet sites. A staple of library collections since the 1950s, and redesigned with a fresh new look in 1996, the new True Books series is the definitive nonfiction series for elementary school readers.

Buy United States Of America (Enchantment Of The World. Second Series)
United States Of America (Enchantment Of The World. Second Series) by Martin Hintz
To much of the world, the United staes of Ameirca is an example of freedom and democracy.

Monday, March 14, 2011

JAZZ

Jazz
Tanner Paul O.W., Megill David W., Gerow Maurice
"Jazz"
Even though some of the eras of jazz music sound extremely different from others, it is our contention that jazz has evolved logically from one era to the next. This study attempts to show the logical musical derivatives and developments of jazz and at the same time to point out the important elements that compose the individual styles of jazz as they evolved from era to era.

Who would have the "chops" to write the definitive textbook on Jazz? How about a musician/composer/arranger who played with just about every Jazz great, with some notables being Glenn Miller and Tex Beneke? How about a man who has arranged, composed, and performed with everyone from A (Arturo Toscanini) to Z (Zubin Mehta)? Want more chops? How about the guy who invented (and played) a musical instrument (the electro-theremin or "Tannerin") that creates those wonderful weird glides you hear on the Beach Boys' "Good Vibrations" or the them song to My Favorite Martian? Experience not enough? How about academics: an author with both Masters and Doctorate degrees who became a Distinguished Professor at UCLA teaching about Jazz for over 20 years? The person with that experience, who definitely has the chops, is Paul Tanner, the lead author of this book. 

I had the good fortune to be one of Dr. Tanner's students eons ago at UCLA. Beyond his ability to entertain was his ability to teach the principles, theory, and practice of Jazz, especially to non-musically inclined students. In his 90's today, according to IMDB, he still lectures writes. 

Yes, Dr. Tanner and colleagues have the chops, and you can count on this book being the most definitive of its kind. The book is a textbook, to be sure -- meant to be used in conjunction with study, and priced as textbooks are priced, which ain't cheap. But because the online media lets you hear the topics not just read about them, I would recommend it for anyone with disposable income who is interested in the history of Jazz, understanding the different flavors of Jazz, and appreciating the musical tricks of the trade. 

NOTE: While not necessary, I would recommend that you have a little knowledge of music to best enjoy the book. You don't need to be a music major, and you do NOT have to play an instrument or know how to read musical notation, but you will get a bit more out of the book if you are familiar with terms like 4/4, 2/4 and chord progressions.

Saturday, March 12, 2011

Music: Expression, Jazz, Soul, and More

"The whole thing of being in music is not to control it but to be swept away by it. Ij"you're swept away by it you can't wait to do it again and the same magical moments always come."
- Bobby Hutcherson, jazz vibraphonist
Warm-Up
1)   Think of your favorite song. Think of its lyrics.  Speak about what you feel in these words, or if the words were not in fact important, but rather the rhythm prevails in moving you.
The Roots of Music: Jazz, a music of the people
"What is jazz? Man, if you have to ask, you will never know."— Louis Armstrong
1)Do you find music to be more powerful with or without words? Are the words more important, or is the rhythm?
2)Does music have a soul? Must music have a soul? What does the soul of jazz music look like, if it could talk what do you think it would say with words? (Follow-up:  If music has a soul, are we in fact in control of it? Or does the music control us? Hint-Refer to quote at the top)
3)Where does the most passionate music come from? Is it from those that have or those that have not? Do oppressed people create better music?
4) What role does improvisation play in jazz music? What is the beauty of improvisation that is not captured in predictable rhythms? Could jazz be jazz without it? How else would the African-American community expressed themselves (Hint: they couldn't use words, their society wouldn't let them)?

Contemporary Music:  Progress or Regress?
5)What makes music in fact music? Where do you draw the line (how much of it must be made with real people vs. machines)? (Hint: Think of Question 2 in the earlier section, about soul).
6)Can you consider music today inventive, progress, or is it simply stealing ideas from the past and making them different (Think about how many songs are sampled, remade)?
7)What happenings must occur in society in order to produce a new movement of music? In what ways does music reflect the cultural values of a time and people?
8)With the process of globalization, music being shared around the world with so many people,  is there still a chance to hear a music that is pure and traditional?

Recommended Listening: Jazz- Miles Davis, Kin d of Blue John Coltrane, Blue Train Horace Silver, Song For My Father, Louis Armstrong Hot Five Recordings, Cannonball Adderley, Somethin' Else








video


Thursday, March 10, 2011

Senior Citizens in the United States and in Ukraine


On March 9 2011 it was a discussion of a topic “Senior Citizens in the United States and in Ukraine” at Vinnytsia Information Center “Window on America”.
The participants of this Discovery Club's meeting had the opportunity to speak about senior centers and a common retirement age in the United States, to share their  experience about seniors' lifestyles (a behavior, an entertainment, a leisure, habits, a healthy way of life, sport, etc.) taking into consideration activities that senior citizens would not normally do in Ukraine but do in the USA.
The users of the Center made the presentation of seniors in the USA reviewing the culture  nugget informing about senior centers of Boston.
There were students of Pedagogical College, a social worker and students of the secondary schools.

OLDER ADULTS
Prep&Preview
1.Think about seniors, or older adults, in your country. Write down five ways that a person's age may affect his or her actions. For example, in many countries, senior citizens would never go to a disco, just because of their age. They might not swim, or wear blue jeans, for example, just because of their age. (This question is not about activities connected to health limitations of older people.)
a.    _____________________________________
b._______________________________________
c.    _____________________________________
d.    _____________________________________
e.    _____________________________________

2.When you are 70, is there anything that you will not do, just because of your age? If so, what is it, and why won't you do it? (Let's assume you're in good health.)
3.In your opinion, at what age does "old age" start?

CULTURE NUGGET
In the United States, a common retirement age is 65. At age 65, retirement used to be mandatory (обязательный) in the U.S., but now there is no age limit for retirement. However, it is at 65 that people can receive their full social security benefits. What is the retirement age in your country?
In your group, do you know senior citizens in the U.S.? If so, have you seen anything in their lifestyles that you probably would not see in seniors' lifestyles in your country? Share your thoughts with your group.
The Activity
Read the list in table 5. Now think about the behavior in your country. In just one afternoon of your daily life in your country, do you think you could find a senior who was doing this activity? Write "yes" or "no" in the first column.

Laziness

Introductions
  1. This week marked the birth and death of Taras Shevchenko. Who is your favorite writer? What magazines, newspapers of online sources do you like to read?
  2. There is a saying that, “The best things in life are free.” Do you believe its true? What are the best things in life for you?
Discussion Topic: Laziness
1.Are you a lazy person? In what way? Why are  you lazy?
2.How do you motivate yourself to work hard when you don’t want to? In general, what motivates you in life? 
3.Do you anyone is both lazy and successful? 
4.How do you personally fight against laziness in your life? 
5.Have you ever missed a good opportunity in life because of laziness? 

Questions
Can you imagine some situation when you would be willing to work for free? What kind of work would it be?
Would you like to be the director of a big business? Do you think that this kind of work suits you and your personality?
If you could start all over again, what would you change about your profession? What would study at the university?
What was your dream as a child? Does it still remain in anyway?
What was the most unusual thing you have ever seen on a train, or bus?
Do you think that you would like to be a stage actress or singer? Would you be nervous performing in front of so many people?
If you didn’t have to worry about money, how would you spend your days?
If you could learn any skill, what would it be?
If you had to be either three inches taller, or three inches shorter, which would you choose?
If you could be any superhero, which one would you like to be?
Would you rather be know as being good looking or a good person?

COMPARATIVE TEACHING OF W. WHITMAN AND T. SHEVCHENKO AS THE REFLECTION OF THE UKRAINIAN AND AMERICAN NATIONAL IDENTITY

Rybinska Y.
(Київ, Україна)

У статті запропоновано вивчення літератури на засадах компаративних зв 'язків, що являє собою велику можливість для обговорення національної ідентичності й ша­нобливого ставлення до світових культурних надбань. Т. Шевченко та В. Вітмен - два національних поета, яким вдалося передати досвід своїх націй, характер та ідеї людей, їх вважають центральними важливими постатями в сучасній Американській і Укра­їнській літературах. Компаративне вивчення двох авторів допоможе краще збагнути особливості двох культур, літератур та ін., одночасно зберегти відтінок національної ідентичності й виховувати мультикультуралізм.
Ключові слова: національна ідентичність, компаративне навчання, народний характер.
The article proposes exploring literature in its comparative relationship which provides a great opportunity to revive discussion of national identity and a respectful attitude to the world's cultural treasures of folk consciousness, T.Shevchenko and W.Whitman are two national poets who articulate the experience of their nation, its character, and ideas of people. They are considered to be two central figures in modern Ukrainian and American literatures. The comparative teaching of both poets will help better understand the specific of two cultures, literature etc, at the same time saving the tint of national identity and bringing up multicultural ism.
Key words: national identity, comparative teaching, folk character:
Walt Whitman at the beginning of his greatest poem «Song of Myself» can observe all of his greatest ideas: the individual self of which it is worthy to sing, the common and democratic self extending to all people the same song and privileges he gives himself, the natural self gazing at the humble yet complete beauty of the grass, the philosophical self inviting others to enjoy and understand the good earth and the sun and individually to take and understand all that heaven and earth have to give. As an individual, common, natural, philosophical man among all men and women, Walt Whitman is America's national poet.
No one agreed that Walt Whitman would be the national poet of the United States until after the 1950s, a full sixty years after his death in 1819, most people knowledgeable about poetry now believe he is the poet who speaks most clearly about it means to be an American. Not that this designation is not controversial Other candidates have might be mentioned: Robert Frost, Hart Crane, William Carlos Williams, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, even Emily Dickinson. But Whitman is the strongest. He is America's national poet both for why he is loved and why he is condemned-First, a definition of a national poet: this man or woman, by both tradition and popular under­standing, articulates the experience of that nation, that nation's character, and its ideas about itself.

A III tough criticized in his time for his poetic form and private life, Walt Whitman is a national poet. If you want to know the United Stales as an idea, especially the United States that emerged as an empire in the mid to late 19th century, you can go to Walt Whitman to discover this idea.
As might be expected of America's national poet. Whitman spent his whole life in America, He was bom in Long Island znd rarely ventured far from Long Island, dying in 1892 in New Jersey, less that 100 miles from his birthplace. Like most American poets of (rue artistic merit, he was not embraced by a large readership and spent most of his life outside of the popular tastes of his time. Also like most American poets, he was forced to earn a living outside of his art: at vari­ous times in his life he was a carpenter, printer, journalist, teacher, and editor. Like most American poets with national ambitions (again, like Crane and Williams, for example), he wrote an epic. Unlike both Williams and Crane, Whitman's epic, «Song of Myself,» is widely read.
Also, as made possible by his country's «Declaration of Independence» and «Constitution,» he was an uncompromising individualist. He believed with Emerson that «whoso would be a man» must be a nonconformist He resisted all attempts for others to bring his writing and him into conformity with tastes imported largely from England and Italy. And yet even though a rebel, a nonconformist, a man shunned by «decent» people, Whitman has come closest to representing the ideals of that nation and society that pushed him away. He brought all of life into poetry and wrote so that any common man or woman could, understand him.

Monday, March 7, 2011

Literature by Women

The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Traditions in English (Third Edition)  (Vol. 2)
Long the standard teaching anthology, the landmark Norton Anthology of Literature by Women has introduced generations of readers to the rich variety of women’s writing in English.

Now, the much-anticipated Third Edition responds to the wealth of writing by women across the globe with the inclusion of 61 new authors (219 in all) whose diverse works span six centuries.  A more flexible two-volume format and a versatile new companion reader make the Third Edition an even better teaching tool. 

"As diversity itself has shaped the evolution of feminist criticism, from its early preoccupation with women's shared experiences to its more recent absorption in the complex issues and assumptions informing English-language texts by women writers of diverse geographical, cultural, racial, sexual, religious, and class origins and influences, so diversity has shaped the revisions of this anthology." —From the Preface

About the Author
Sandra M. Gilbert is the author of numerous volumes of criticism and poetry, as well as a memoir. She is coeditor (with Susan Gubar) of The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women. A Distinguished Professor of English emerita at the University of California, Davis, she lives in Berkeley, California.

Susan Gubar (Ph.D. University of Iowa) is a Distinguished Professor at Indiana University, where she has won numerous teaching awards, most recently the Faculty Mentor Award from the Indiana University Graduate and Professional Student Organization. In addition to her critical collaboration with Sandra Gilbert, she is the author of Racechanges: White Skin, Black Face in American Culture (1997), Critical Condition: Feminism at the Turn of the Century (2000), Poetry After Auschwitz: Remembering What One Never Knew (2003), and Rooms of Our Own (2006), and editor of the first annotated edition of Woolf's A Room of One's Own (2005) and True Confessions (2011).

Women’s Day

Introductions

What would you most like to be famous for?
Now that Spring is here, what outdoor activities are you planning to do?

Discussion Topic: Women’s Day

1.What is the history of Women’s Day? Why is it celebrated in Ukraine but not in the United States?
2.What are men’s responsibilities on this holiday? Who should they congratulate on this holiday? Only their wives?
3.There is a saying that, “everyday should be like Valentine’s Day.” Do you think it’s true about Women’s Day as well? Should Husbands try to make something special for their wives everyday?
4.For women, what would be the best possible Women’s Day for you?
5.For men, what holiday do you think is the best or most interesting one?

Mystery Questions

Our Schedule

Saturday, March 5 – 1400 Rehabilitation Center
Tuesday, March 8 – No English Club – Women’s Day!
Thursday, March 10 – 1730 Library
Saturday, March 12 – 1030 Library

Join Our Group on www.Facebook.com – English Club in Vinnytsia
English Club Blog - www.woavinnitsa.blogspot.com
Our Rules

It is forbidden to disrespect or insult another member of the Club.

We are guests of the Library Staff. Club Members should bring a library card, and respect the librarians at all times.

All forms of discrimination (such as racism, sexism, etc.) are not allowed in the club. Discriminatory comments should be kept to yourself.

Making fun of or insulting someone else’s level of English is inappropriate and rude. None of us speak English perfectly (not even the native-speakers), so there is no cause for insulting someone else. It is forbidden in our club meetings.

Everyone is allowed to tell their opinion.

Everyone should be given an opportunity to speak, so it is not appropriate to talk throughout the whole meeting. A response to a question should not last more than one minute.

If a member of the club consistently breaks the rules, they will not be allowed to attend the club anymore.
Questions

Can you imagine some situation when you would be willing to work for free? What kind of work would it be?
Would you like to be the director of a big business? Do you think that this kind of work suits you and your personality?
If you could start all over again, what would you change about your profession? What would study at the university?
What was your dream as a child? Does it still remain in anyway?
What was the most unusual thing you have ever seen on a train, or bus?
Do you think that you would like to be a stage actress or singer? Would you be nervous performing in front of so many people?
If you didn’t have to worry about money, how would you spend your days?
If you could learn any skill, what would it be?
If you had to be either three inches taller, or three inches shorter, which would you choose?
If you could be any superhero, which one would you like to be?
Would you rather be know as being good looking or a good person?

Sunday, March 6, 2011

Women's Detective Fiction

Feminism in Women's Detective Fiction

Names such as Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot, and Sam Spade are perhaps better known than the names of the authors who created them. The woman detective has also had worldwide appeal; yet, with the exception of Christie's Miss Marple, the names of female detectives and their authors have only recently gained wide attention through the popularity of Marcia Muller, Sue Grafton, and Sara Paretsky.


The essays in this collection grapple with a wide range of issues important to the female sleuth - the most important, perhaps, being the oft-heard challenge to her suitability for the job. Not surprisingly, gender issues are the main focus of all the essays; indeed, in detective novels with a woman protagonist, these issues are often right at the surface.


Some of the papers see the female sleuth as an important force in popular fiction, but many also challenge the notion that the woman detective is a positive model for feminists. They argue that fictional female sleuths have lost the otherness' that a feminine approach to the genre should encourage. Collectively, the essays also reveal the differences between British and American perspectives on the woman detective.

Extraordinary Women

You have an opportunity to read these books at our Center "Window on America".
History ... and Herstory
 The Scholastic Encyclopedia of Women in the United States
        Women have always made history in the United States, but the haven't always made it into history books. This book addresses that omission. It tells the story of women's many contributions to the shaping of this nation. Some women became famous for their work, their ideas, or their leadership. Other women - just by surviving on the frontier, in factories, or on the frontlines of reform movements - proved they were hardly the "Weaker sex". Many endured poverty, racism, and sexism to accomplish their goals.
         The Scholastic Encyclopedia of Women in the United States includes brief biographies of 214 women. you can also read about the significant contributions of more than 48 others. They represent the broad range of American  womne's lives from before the 1500s to today. 
        Anne Bradstreet, Pocahontas, Lucretia Mott, Nellie Bly, Isadora Duncan, Amelia Earhart, Dr. Karen Horney, Marilyn Monroe, Oprah Winfrey, Hillary Rodham Clinton... these are women who, over the last 400 years, have helped shape the United States. Packed with intriguing photos and illustrations, this big, glorious volume chronicles and celebrates the lives and achievements of more than 250 American women for the benefit of tomorrow's history-makers. Six different time periods form the framework for the biographies and "Cameos" (more succinct bios of notable women), which are alphabetically arranged. Various sidebars appear in red in the side columns throughout, providing quotations and further insights into some of the issues raised in the biographical entries. A topical index allows readers to search for women in a particular field or category (abolitionists, scientists, Olympic medal winners, astronauts, African American women, politicians, spies, inventors, singers, etc.), and there's also an alphabetical index, which can be used to find particular women, places, events, and topics. Icons to the left of each name identify the women as fitting in one of 10 broad subject areas, including religion, media, military, sciences/math, sports, etc. Just browsing through this encyclopedia will make young readers feel proud of the incredible contributions the "weaker sex" has made--and continues to make--to the world.
II. Extraordinary Women of Medicine
Buy Extraordinary Women Of Medicine
Extraordinary Women Of Medicine
by Darlene R. Stille
Florence Nightingale, Clara Barton, and former U.S. Surgeon General Antonia Novello are among the several 
dozen professionals profiled in "Extraordinary Women of Medicine". The biographies explore the lives of women who have achieved success in the field of medicine throughout history.
This outstanding collection of short, easy-to-read biographies and historical events is designed to acquaint 
with the accomplishments of extraordinary people.
III. Extraordinary Women - Journalists

Extraordinary Women Journalists (Extraordinary People)
Claire Price-Groff profiles well-known and lesser-known figures from diverse areas of journalism from the Revolution to the present day. She describes the lives and careers of over 50 reporters, publishers, humorists, columnists, photographers, and television journalists. Chapters are short but full of useful information and are accompanied by large black-and-white photos. Because these women's chosen field intersects with so many other subjects, students learn about American and world history, politics, and culture as they read these short biographies. They are good reads, often including tales of daring and triumph over long odds. Foreign correspondent Sigrid Lillian Schultz revealed and foiled Nazi plots. Charlayne Hunter-Gault fought segregation laws to obtain her journalism degree and subsequently won two Emmy Awards. An appendix gives sketches of an additional 64 journalists. A list of organizations and Internet sites related to women, history, and journalism is included. Good for reports or leisure reading.

About This Book
This book profiles the life and work of notable women journalists, including Sarah Hale, Margaret Fuller, and Nellie Bly.
Series Information
Sixty to 80 real-life stories of struggle, achievement, victory, and sometimes loss come together in each volume of the Extraordinary People series. The ideal companion for history, social science, language arts, and geography studies, Extraordinary People brings into focus the unique histories of people from every era, every culture, and every walk of life. They're all here — the famous and the not-so-famous, the politicians and the educators, the explorers and the adventurers, the pioneers and the inventors, the writers and the musicians, the scientists and the doctors — extraordinary people one and all whose extraordinary achievements have left their mark on history.
Indexed by name and subject, with "To Find Out More" reading and website pages, Extraordinary People is the perfect starter for students who want to know more about the people who shaped their world.

“Women in Classical Chinese Art”

The Bohdan and Varvara Khanenko Art Museum holds an exhibition titled “Women in Classical Chinese Art” /http://www.day.kiev.ua//
"The Art museum’s collection of classical Chinese paintings comprises over 350 works by painters from the 16th century to the beginning of the 20th century and includes all existing genres. The ancient scrolls of Chinese masters depict a panorama of people’s lives, natural landscapes, and unique phenomena. Women’s beauty has been a leading theme in paintings from the dawn of its invention to modern times..." /Day. Weekly Digest/.
Read more: http://www.day.kiev.ua/

Women's Day


 Introductions
What would you most like to be famous for? 
Now that Spring is here, what outdoor activities are you planning to do? 

Discussion Topic: Women’s Day
1.What is the history of Women’s Day? Why is it celebrated in Ukraine but not in the United States? 
2.What are men’s responsibilities on this holiday? Who should they congratulate on this holiday? Only their wives?
3.There is a saying that, “everyday should be like Valentine’s Day.” Do you think it’s true about Women’s Day as well? Should Husbands try to make something special for their wives everyday?
4.For women, what would be the best possible Women’s Day for you? 
5.For men, what holiday do you think is the best or most interesting one?

Mystery Questions

Our Schedule
Saturday, March 5 – 1400 Rehabilitation Center 
Tuesday, March 8 – No English Club – Women’s Day!
Thursday, March 10 – 1730 Library
Saturday, March 12 – 1030 Library

Join Our Group on www.Facebook.com – English Club in Vinnytsia
English Club Blog - www.woavinnitsa.blogspot.com

Our Rules
It is forbidden to disrespect or insult another member of the Club.
We are guests of the Library Staff. Club Members should bring a library card, and respect the librarians at all times.
All forms of discrimination (such as racism, sexism, etc.) are not allowed in the club. Discriminatory comments should be kept to yourself. 
Making fun of or insulting someone else’s level of English is inappropriate and rude. None of us speak English perfectly (not even the native-speakers), so there is no cause for insulting someone else. It is forbidden in our club meetings.
Everyone is allowed to tell their opinion.
Everyone should be given an opportunity to speak, so it is not appropriate to talk throughout the whole meeting. A response to a question should not last more than one minute.
If a member of the club consistently breaks the rules, they will not be allowed to attend the club anymore.

Questions

Can you imagine some situation when you would be willing to work for free? What kind of work would it be?
Would you like to be the director of a big business? Do you think that this kind of work suits you and your personality?
If you could start all over again, what would you change about your profession? What would study at the university?
What was your dream as a child? Does it still remain in anyway?
What was the most unusual thing you have ever seen on a train, or bus?
Do you think that you would like to be a stage actress or singer? Would you be nervous performing in front of so many people?
If you didn’t have to worry about money, how would you spend your days?
If you could learn any skill, what would it be?
If you had to be either three inches taller, or three inches shorter, which would you choose?
If you could be any superhero, which one would you like to be?
Would you rather be know as being good looking or a good person?

Travelling to the UK

On March 2 2011 Oleksii Riabokon,  a Senior  Teacher  of the Ukrainian Studies Department of the Vinnitsia National Pirogov Memorial Medical University, presented a report on his travelling to the UK. Over 90 photos with sights of London were demonstrated and commented. The focus was on the Buckingham Palace, Sherlock Holm’s  Museum, Madame Tussaud’s Waxen Figures Museum, Natural History Museum, St. Paul’s Cathedral, Kensington Palace, Cambridge University.

The report was then discussed with the Club Discovery’s members who were present and asked a lot of questions on the subject.

Friday, March 4, 2011

Reputation

INTRODUCTION
Group Activity: Work together and make a 1-minute presentation
                                        
Discussion Topic: Reputation
Be more concerned with your character than your reputation, because your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are (J. Wooden)

1. How important to you reputation? How important is to you that other people like you or respect you?
2. What are the benefits of having a good reputation?
3. Most people say that they don’t care what other people think about them. If this is true, why do we always, “Dress to impress” or try to show that we are special to others?
4. Do you think that your reputation is different from the person who you really are? Is it possible to create a reputation about yourself that isn’t true?

Mystery Questions

English Club Blog – www.woavinnitsa.blogspot.com


Thursday, March 3, 2011

MASS PAPERBACK PUBLISHER GOES ALL DIGITAL

1.Do you prefer to read e-book or paper editions? Why?
2.Do you think that libraries will soon die out like dinosaurs?
3.Who are the customers of book shops?
4. Should the same edition of the same book in electronic form and in paperback have different prices? Why?
As digital books continue to gain market share, one of the country's oldest mass paper back publishers is abandoning its traditional print books and making its titles available in digital format and print-on-demand only.
Dorchester Publishing Inc., a closely held book and magazine house, said it is making the switch after its book unit sales fell 25% last year, in part because of declining orders from some of its key retail accounts, including Wal-Mart Stores Inc. A spokeswoman for Wal-Mart declined comment.
"It wasn't a long, drawn out decision, because we've been putting in the effort but not getting the results," said Dorchester Chief Executive John Prebich.
The move comes at a time when electronic-book sales are gaining popularity with readers. Mike Shatzkin, chief executive of the Idea Logical Co., publishing consultants, predicts that digital books will be 20% to 25% of unit sales by the end of 2012, up from around 8% today.
The decision to go digital could be a sign of things to come for other small publishers facing declining sales in their traditional print business. Dorchester's switch will likely result in significant savings at a time when it expects its digital sales to double in 2011.
Dorchester, which has been publishing mass market paperbacks since 1971, publishes 25 to 30 new titles a month, approximately 65% of which are romance works. The com pany launched its first mass paperback titles in 1971.
Romance fans in particular have already embraced e-books, in part because customers can read them in public without having to dis play the covers. In addition, type size is easily adjusted on e-readers, making titles published in the mass paperback format easier to read for older customers.
Mr. Prebich estimated that 83% of the books published by Dorchester are priced at $7.99. By comparison, the larger trade paperback format is typically priced at about $14.95.
Dorchester's switch to e-books is effec tive. It plans to make new titles available on a print-on-demand basis through retailers. Ingram Publisher Services, a unit of closely held Ingram Industries Inc., says it will ship orders to retailers as demand arises. News of Dorchester's decision was first reported by Publishers Weekly.
Some authors, Mr. Prebich conceded, may be unhappy if their titles are available only via e-books and print-on-demand, but he said that so far the response has "been receptive to what we're doing."
Hard Case Crime, an imprint owned by closely held Winterfall LLC, said it may seek to move its mystery books from Dorchester to another publishing house.
"It's been a good run, but if they aren't pub lishing mass market paperbacks, we'll have to decide what to do. I'm a believer in the mass format, but I do understand the reality of the marketplace," said Charles Ardai, who owns Hard Case Crime.
The country's largest consumer book pub lisher, Bertelsmann AG's Random House Inc., said it continues to be a strong believer in mass paperbacks. One of the country's most successful mystery writers, the late John D. MacDonald, is available from Random House exclusively in mass paperback.
"It's still a viable, popular, lower-priced alternative to the other reading formats," said Stuart Applebaum, a spokesman for Random House. "It also has a committed readership. Will that commitment be forever in a transformative marketplace? We'll have to wait and see."
By Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg Wall Street Journal
/http://sroblog.com/2010/08/07/mass-paperback-publisher-goes-all-digital-wsj-com//

Identity in America: Are Perspectives Shifting?

Blending cultures may be redefining what it means to be American
Multicultural, post-ethnic, post-racial. While these descriptors are debated, most agree that with the possible exception of the American Indian, to be American is to be, genealogically speaking, from somewhere else. During February, America.gov is exploring how the ever-increasing diversity of the U.S. population is affecting the way Americans view themselves.
Americans love anniversaries, special months, holidays and observances related to the calendar. The president alone issues more than a hundred proclamations each year on special days, weeks or months. Many months are dedicated to one or more ethnic or social groups, and month long celebrations highlight their contributions and the unique flavor they bring to American society. Here are just a few examples of diversity celebrations in the United States.
Read more:
http://www.america.gov/st/diversity-english/2009/January/20090129121357fsyelkaew0.9819147.html#ixzz1FXfo8TvA
http://www.america.gov//identity.html

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

П’ятдесята річниця Корпусу миру

Logo
У березні виповнюється п’ятдесят років Корпусу миру. Перші волонтери Корпусу миру поїхали до Гани та Танзанії  в серпні 1961 р., через 6 місяців після того, як президент Джон Кеннеді 1 березня 1961 р. підписав указ про створення Корпусу миру. Відтоді понад 200 тис. американців служили волонтерами Корпусу миру, сприяючи взаєморозумінню між американським та іншими народами у 139 країнах світу. Часи змінилися, проте Корпус миру продовжує виконувати свою місію – сприяти миру та дружбі. Сьогодні понад 8655 волонтерів працюють з місцевими громадами в 77 країнах. Волонтерами можуть бути громадяни США, старші за 18 років. Їхній термін перебування в країні - 27 місяців. Детальніше про Корпус миру (англійською):  www.peacecorps.gov.
Корпус Миру США в Україні було засновано 1992 р., коли український Президент Леонід Кравчук та американський Президент Джордж Буш підписали двосторонню угоду про започаткування Корпусу Миру США в Україні. Відтоді Корпус Миру співпрацював з багатьма організаціями в Україні. Американські добровольці живуть і працюють пліч-о-пліч з українцями протягом двох років, обмінюючись досвідом та започатковуючи стосунки, які часто триватимуть усе життя. Мета Корпусу миру: допомагати громадянам України шляхом надання компетентних спеціалістів для задоволення існуючих потреб у відповідній кваліфікації; сприяти кращому розумінню американців українцями і українців американцями. Добровольці викладають англійську мову в середніх школах, університетах і педагогічних коледжах, проводять тренінги в інститутах післядипломної освіти педагогічних кадрів. Вони допомагають учителям розширювати асортимент навчальних засобів для роботи в класі і допомагають студентам набути навичок володіння мовами, які допоможуть їм досягти успіху в подальшій освіті та в майбутній кар'єрі. Добровольці працюють у середніх школах і технікумах, співпрацюють з місцевими відділами у справах сім'ї, молоді та спорту з метою надання молодим українцям допомоги, необхідної для досягнення успіху в кар'єрі та в житті. Вони проводять уроки в школах, організовують позакласні заходи та реалізовують громадські проекти, спрямовані на запобігання зловживанню алкоголем, палінню, вживанню наркотиків та розповсюдженню ВІЛ. Добровольці популяризують здоровий спосіб життя, сприяють розвитку навичок у галузях інформаційних технологій, бізнесу, лідерства, громадянської свідомості, екології та кар'єрного розвитку. Добровольці здебільшого співпрацюють з неурядовими організаціями, місцевими організаціями самоврядування, місцевими органами виконавчої влади та бізнес-структурами. Добровольці сприяють соціальному та економічному розвитку на місцевому рівні. Про Корпус миру в Україні див.: http://ukrainian.ukraine.usembassy.gov/uk/peace-corps.html
Волонтери Корпусу миру активно співпрацюють і з бібліотеками в Україні, зокрема з інформаційними центрами «Вікно в Америку». Чимало українських книгозбірень у партнерстві з волонтерами Корпусу миру започаткували нові послуги для читачів, підвищили кваліфікацію своїх працівників, поповнили фонди бібліотек літературою, отримали гранти на технічне обладнання тощо. Рогатинська центральна районна бібліотека Івано-Франківської області навіть створила відео: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cd5lmFOyINU (про це ми вже писали на цьому блозі).  Було би цікаво почути від працівників бібліотек-читачів цього блогу про їхню співпрацю з волонтерами Корпусу миру, розповіді про те, як запросити волонтера до своєї бібліотеки, чи варто це робити тощо. Чекаємо дописів!